Monday, March 31, 2014

5 Tips for Turning Your Tiny Habits into Big Results

Change your life and reach your goals, all by making small tweaks to your daily routine.

Following Stanford researcher and professor BJ Fogg's principles in behavior design can painlessly and seamlessly change your life, all without using willpower or motivation. But it can be a bit tricky to master at first. Dive into our full-length feature on the life-changing Tiny Habits program, read our tips below, and then visit Fogg’s website tinyhabits.com to begin your journey.

1. Make your Tiny Habit “crispy,” or specific.
 Be very specific—“crispify” your Tiny Habit in a way that everybody understands the behavior. Think of your Tiny Habit as a solution you design for. Unlike aspirations, when you design for a solution, you don’t leave it to chance. Crispify, design for a solution and then iterate or repeat as needed.
2. Top Habit-eers think, “The starting point is never too tiny.” At Fogg’s SXSW presentation on Tiny Habits, he mentioned that his top Tiny Habit program participants generally think that you can never start too small with designing new behavior. Participants whose Tiny Habits weren’t effective only had to make their starting point even smaller in order for their desired behavior to effortlessly stick.

3. Design for ‘DO stuff’ behavior. 
When thinking of your desired goal or behavior, Tiny Habits work best when you design for “DO stuff” behavior—do a new behavior, do familiar behavior or increase an existing behavior’s intensity or duration. Behaviors that you don’t do are trickier to design.

4. Springboard your way to success! 
Behavior-wise, goals that are big leaps generally don’t work, unless you’re using the momentum of Tiny Habits. Fogg states, “As long as you’re doing these little tiny behaviors and succeeding, there comes a moment when it seems like you just step up to the plate for something big. You think, I CAN do this big thing that I’ve procrastinated for a long, long time.”

5. The more Tiny Habits you create, the better you get at it. 
Just like the skill of practicing an instrument, the more you design for Tiny Habits, the better—and more successful—you get at it. Don’t feel guilty when something doesn’t work. Revise, practice and design your Tiny Habits to become even “crispier” and more conducive to change. Here are a few suggestions from Fogg, along with a Tiny Habit I’ve been working on.

Remember, the formula for creating a Tiny Habit is: After I (routine), I will (tiny behavior).
- After I check into a hotel, I will see where the hotel gym is located.
Professor Fogg has a set of Tiny Habits for when he travels, and immediately walking to the hotel gym makes the behavior of going to the gym much easier as his hotel stay continues.
- In the morning, after I first sit down at work, I will put a glass of water on my desk.
This was an example Professor Fogg used in his SXSW presentation. Instead of just saying you’ll drink more water, taking the small action of filling a glass of water encourages the natural behavior of drinking from it, and refilling it as the day continues.
- After I delete a batch of emails, I will take one deep, 5-second breath.
I generally delete emails after reading or completing the task associated with them, so this has helped me feel much more calm, accomplished and in control throughout the day.
Common routines that you can use as “triggers” to form your Tiny Habits:
- Pour coffee
- Park your car
- Sit down on subway
- Turn on the shower
- Pee
- Brush your teeth
- Enter your home after work
- Hear the phone ring
- Drop off kids at school
- Put on contacts/glasses
- Start the dishwasher


Monday, March 17, 2014

Single Handle Every Task

This was written by Brian Tracy.  I found it useful and thought I would share.



Eat that frog! Every bit of planning, prioritizing and organizing comes down to this simple concept.

Your ability to select your most important task, to begin it and then to concentrate on it single mindedly until it is complete is the key to high levels of performance and personal productivity.

The Requirement for Every Great AchievementEvery great achievement of mankind has been preceded by a long period of hard, concentrated work until the job was done. Single handling requires that once you begin, you keep working at the task, without diversion or distraction, until the job is 100% complete. You keep urging yourself onward by repeating the words "Back to work!" over and over whenever you are tempted to stop or do something else.

Reduce Your Time By 50%By concentrating single mindedly on your most important task, you can reduce the time required to complete it by 50% or more. 

It has been estimated that the tendency to start and stop a task, to pick it up, put it down and come back to it can increase the time necessary to complete the task by as much as 500%.

Each time you return to the task, you have to familiarize yourself with where you were when you stopped and what you still have to do. You have to overcome inertia and get yourself going again. You have to develop momentum and get into a productive work rhythm.

Develop Energy and EnthusiasmBut when you prepare thoroughly and then begin, refusing to stop or turn aside until the job is done, you develop energy, enthusiasm and motivation. You get better and better and more productive. You work faster and more effectively.

Never Waste TimeThe truth is that once you have decided on your number one task, anything else that you do other than that is a relative waste of time. Any other activity is just not as valuable or as important as this job, based on your own priorities.

Action ExercisesEat That Frog! Take action! Resolve today to select the most important task or project that you could complete and then launch into it immediately.

Once you start your most important task, discipline yourself to persevere without diversion or distraction until it is 100% complete. See it as a "test" to determine whether you are the kind of person who can make a decision to complete something and then carry it out. Once you begin, refuse to stop until the job is finished.

Monday, March 3, 2014

The Life We Don't Live.



Jesus told us, "I have come that they (you) may have life and have it more abundantly.  Focus more on what you have and less on that of others and you will see how much you have to give thanks for.  I leave you today with this inspiring video.




Be blessed and be thankful just as Nick.